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Removing palm thatch roof - peering inside

Removing palm thatch roof – peering inside

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge showed an image of rebar – called ‘varillas’ in Latin America, and it reminded me of a project from the past two weeks.  Last week I was given a great lesson in construction in reverse fashion.

0 rancho lands

Because of pending regulations in the maritime zone of Nandayure Costa Rica, I had to tear down the thatched-roof rancho in order to move forward with a concession for new construction.   In four days, workers demolished a property that held almost ten years of Zeebra memories.

Before, during and after... and then the rewind button reversed the process.

Before, during and after… and then the rewind button reversed the process.

I held my wounds inside while attempting an honest smile as the men first removed the palm thatch, then the teak beams, then the upstairs flooring and wooden walls, the 6 ‘horcones’ and finally the concrete walls.

kaPOW! FINAL BLOWS -  view thru the varillas

kaPOW! FINAL BLOWS – view thru the varillas

There are always ‘innocent casualties’ from war zones, and the plants near the foundation suffered as well.  I reminded myself often that it really didn’t matter.. they were planted with love, tended with love, and when neglected they grew from a willingness to please; most will grow back. They often served as reference material for my paintings – like in this painting of the rufous naped wrens that sang lovely “Weird pee-ple live here”-songs and brightened the garden areas.

Rufous-naped wrens - Acrylic

Rufous-naped wrens – Acrylic – copyright Lisa Brunetti

In addition to that very-serious emotional wound of tearing down the rancho,  I was given a lovely welcome-back greeting from a neighbor who amply salted those wounds.  Not only had they recently cut the 20-foot high hibiscus hedge/screen to the ground,  they also cut (sold?) four or more shade trees in that same boundary line.  What a lovely new neighbor I have yet to meet!

Inside - Hibiscus tea straight from the gardens!

Inside – Hibiscus tea straight from the gardens!

Hibiscus tea straight from that green hedge in the background.

Hibiscus tea straight from that green hedge in the background.

Lumber from the rancho; hibiscus hedge sorely missing behind the mango tree.

Lumber from the rancho; hibiscus hedge sorely missing beside the mango tree.

My friends and hosts Hank and Marie joined me each day.  We peered inside the roof panels, inside the broken varillos, until finally the inside was no longer inside but outside in the sun.  Load after load of timber and lumber went from this site to their bodega.  In time, a token structure will rise from the ashes, though in another location.

Rancho hand-painted floor - shaman's circle in foreground.

Rancho hand-painted floor – shaman’s circle in foreground.

Z for Zeebra, slose the book.

Z for Zeebra, close the book.

Thanks, Michelle, for a great WordPress challenge, and thanks dear wonderful Immigration folks in Manta Ecuador who gave me a very-special visa so I could leave and tend to this tramite (step) and be able to return to Ecuador in good graces!

Hank and Marie - Team Zeebra!

Hank and Marie – Team Zeebra!

Thanks, Hank and Marie, who were there every single day and to many others who were there in spirit.   I’m now back in Mindo Ecuador, where I will be working on photos and stories while helping friends move into their new amazing and beautiful property!

Where I spent my 2-2-week summer vacation!  Ha!   No More Rancho!

Where I spent my 2-week summer vacation! Ha!
No More Rancho!

Now you know where I’ve been and what’s been happening in the private life of your friend the Zeebra.  The rancho is ‘no more,’ but I have a plan, and it’s incubating.

Z

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